Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Ligularia

I've decided to plant more perennials in my garden, when I have read the description of many perennials in other blogs. And I thought of Ligularia growing for several years in my semi-shadow garden.


I grow these two varieties of them: Ligularia 'Przewalskii' (Golden Ray) and Ligularia dentata 'Othello' (Golden groundsel) 

 
I've recently watched at another variety of Ligularia dentata 'Desdemona' (Bigleaf Goldenray) in the magazine, and would like to purchase it. These Ligularias attract a large number of butterflies and other insects in my garden.


So I've written in my 'Garden plan 'to do':
1. to divide roots of an old Ligularia
2. to find a place for divided parts in semi-shade
3. and to plant them with fertilizers in fall


Can anyone who has an experience advise me:
how should I better divide the roots: by hands or a shovel? 
Thank you!

58 comments:

  1. My dear Nadezda , very beautiful photos ! I have no advices because I don't know this plant and here, I think , I am not sure , that we don't have this !
    Good luck !
    Olympia

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    1. Thank you, Olimpia!
      Have a nice weekend!

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  2. Ligularia is a dramatic, big, bold plant that I would love to grow. But I can't find a good, shady spot with enough room (I have almost no shade). I like seeing how they add a punch of foliage and color in your garden. Those bright yellow rocket flowers are eye catching!

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    1. Yes, you're right, the Ligularia flowers are eye attracting! Thank you, Laurrie!

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  3. I would definitely want more of this gorgeous plant in my garden! I split and moved quite a few things last fall. Now I am anxiously waiting to see how they will do this summer. Good luck with your splitting and planting Nadezda :)

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    1. Rosemary, I'm glad having these Ligularias. The neighbors often ask me what the plant with big leaves is. It draws the attention, especially with butterflies. Thank you!

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  4. I usually use both. Firsta shovel, then hands...i have those Ligularias as well and one or two else too. I don't know their official names. I'm bad with plants' names...

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    1. Satu, it's nice you have them in your garden too! I will divide Ligularia very carefully because of its fragile roots. Thank you!

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  5. Nadezhda!
    Ligularia is a beautiful plant. It has great flowers.
    I admire your photos. They are beautiful.
    I have no luck with Ligularia. He does not like me.
    Regards

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    1. I guess Ligularia likes you but you planted it in sunny spot, and it needs shadow. If you find another place, Ligularia will be OK. Thank you, Lucia!

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  6. Hello Nadezda,
    I have been admiring your photographs. They are very good.
    This Ligularia is a lovely plant. I asked AGA who is more of a gardener than I how they should be divided and he said 'use a shovel'.
    Bye for now
    Kirk

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    1. Kirk, your advice is useful for my work plan, I wrote there: 'divide a shovel' Thank you!

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  7. Dear Nadezda,
    After I posted my comment AGA added that the shovel should be sharp, so you get a good cut.
    Kirk

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    1. Kirk, I noticed in my plan 'sharpen a shovel'!
      I've read you was ill, take care!
      Thank you!

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  8. I've never divided these plants but they are beautiful and your pictures with the butterflies and bees are wonderful and remind me of warm summer days!

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    1. Peter, I'm waiting for warmth too. Thank you!

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  9. Oh, how pretty! I've never grown ligularia in my garden - but I can see that I am missing quite a bit! If only I had the right spot for it - will have to look a little harder! Good luck with your dividing.

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    1. Thank you, Holley, I hope you will able to find shady place for Ligularia!

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  10. These Ligularia plants look quite pretty. We have only shade in our garden so we have flowers in planters. Last year though some animals, like deer or squirrels, ate all our flowers – all of them. So I am not sure we will go through the trouble this year – it’s a pity.

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    1. Yes, it's a pity, to lost all flowers in a garden! I'm so sorry, Vagabonde. Thank you!

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  11. Yes, I have both Ligularias and I divided the Ligularia przewalskii just with a shovel some years ago. They are lovely strong plants for the garden. The Ligularia dentata 'Othello' is selfseeding in my garden, so may be in spring in your garden also appear new beautiful dark circular leaves.
    Wish you a lot of success!

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    1. Oh, it would be nice to have new seedlings! But I've never seen any seeds, I think here the warm time is too short and the plant can't grow seeds. Nevertheless I will divide them and plant some new Ligularias in shady places. Thank you, Janneke!

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  12. Hi Nadezda
    Thanks so much for mentioning my blog! I really do love perennials. There are so many to choose from but I do not have Ligularia! So if I have inspired you to plant some new ones, you have just done the same for me. Thanks!
    Astrid

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    1. I love to read your blog, Astrid. Thank you!

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  13. I have a couple of these ligularia, I enjoy how one is tall and slender blooms and the other the more rounded blooms. Yours are quite beautiful!
    I am anxious to hear how you end up splitting yours, I'd like to divide mine but have not tried it before. Wish they would self sow for me.

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    1. Barb, when snow melt, I will realize my work plan and take the photos of Ligularia dividing. Than you!

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  14. The flowers on this plant look quite pretty, I love the colours on the butterfly. Usually plants are divided with a sharp spade or shovel or sometimes you can use secateurs depending on how thick and intertwined the root ball is.

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    1. Karen, your advice is very practical! I will sharpen my shovel for this 'operation'. I'm sure I will need the secateurs too, because this plant is enough big and heavy and has many roots. Thank you!

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  15. Outstanding photographs! I especially love that butterfly, not a species I recognize. There are no Ligularia in my garden, though now and then I consider planting some. Your post gave me another nudge in that direction.

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    1. Jason, I'm glad you liked my photos. Thank you!

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  16. Great image series showing with spring flowers / butterflies :) Hanne Bente

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  17. Happy Valentine's Day, Nadezda!

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  18. First off I have to say that your pictures in this post are really terrific Nadezda! I especially admire the closeup of the bee and butterfly. I have only one Ligularia at the moment. I think these plants are as nice for the foliage as they are for the flowers.

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    1. Jennifer, I'm pleased that you liked these photos!
      Thank you!

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  19. Exellent pictures Nadezda!I love those with the butterfly!Beautiful flower Ligularia is!Spring is comming!I like your new look of your blog!Happy Valentine's Day!!Thank you for your sweet comment on my blog!
    Dimi..

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    1. Dimi, you're right: spring will come, early or lately! Thank you!

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  20. Happy Valentine's Day, Nadezda! I don't know the plants you are presenting today, but they look lovely, look like great insect attractions too. The photo with the butterfly was gorgeous :-)

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    1. Happy Valentine's to you too!
      This Ligularia attracts many insects and I could spend hours taking pictures. I felt me safe between a number of bees,wasps and bumblebees. Thank you!

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  21. Nadezda!!!!!
    Happy Valentine's Day to you too !!!!
    Lucia

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  22. Looks like both a striking foliage and flowering plant! Great close-ups of the bees and the beautiful red butterfly with the eyespots.

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    1. I'm glad you liked my photos, thank you, sweetbay!

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  23. Such a beautiful plant to add to your garden. I love the golden color, and the bees seem to love it. Wonderful plan, Nadezda.

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    1. Michelle, the golden color reminds me summer, sun, warmth, I love it as you. Thank you!

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  24. It sure is worthwhile planting these Ligularias when they are such great insect attractants. Bees, butterflies, insects give much vigour and enhance the garden.

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    1. Of course, you're right, Stiletto. Thank you!

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  25. What amazing photos!!! Always I try to use hands to carefully divide plants.

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    1. Thank you for your advice, Anna! I will neatly do with roots.

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  26. I've never divided perennials unless the plant had developed a second plant that I could easily pull away. But it looks like you've been given some great advice! Good luck!

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    1. Tammy, there are a lot of small plants around the 'mother' bush. I will firstly divide them, as you advised. Thank you!

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  27. They look very pretty - I hope you have luck dividing and growing them. I have been busy dividing my summer-blooming perennials too, mostly campanulas and geraniums.

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    1. Masha, I do hope this dividing will be successful. I know I have to do carefully. Thank you!

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  28. Hi Nadezda, I hope you're doing well. The close up photos of the bees on your Ligularia blossoms are amazing! So pretty. I am growing Ligularia 'Othello' but my ground gets really dry in summer and because they like water, I decided I'm going to dig mine up and put it in a container so I can keep it watered. Also the slugs love to munch on the leaves so the container should help with that too.

    I wish I could tell you how to divide a Ligularia but I've never done it. I imagine it would be similar to a Hosta. You could try prying it apart with hands first and if that doesn't work then use a shovel. Good luck with yours. They're so pretty!

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    1. Grace, I grow hosta and I divide them using a shovel (sharp!) Thanks for your advice, I will do the same with Ligularia. I grow it in shadow place so in hot days I water the plant a little. The slugs, oh! I fight against them especially after a rain.
      Thank you, Grace!

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  29. The blossems of Ligularia are very nice

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    1. I'm glad you're better, thank you, Diny!

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