Monday, June 22, 2015

Red Avens, Geum coccineum



I love this modest plant named Red Avens or Scarlet Avens (Geum coccineum), here we call it Gravilate. I planted four plants variety 'Cooky' in 2010 in my zone 5a garden.





They bloom throughout May and June, re-bloom in the end of July. This May they were one of the first plants to bloom in my garden and have produced a plethora of blooms.



I want to plant several more in fall to create a large swath of bright orange. I grow mine amongst Allium, Geranium and Leucanthemum and they compliment one another very well. Red Avens have beautiful foliage  and I think they are ideal for rock gardens or near dark foliage plants.



Another one Red Aven in my garden is well known variety  'Borizin' (above). It's also perennial herb 35-40 cm tall, flowers are large, bright red, 3-3.5 cm in diameter. I also love this variety because it blooms from late May to 30-40 days. 






All Avens are very hardy, they survive in -30 C and always are healthy and alive in spring.
Do you have this plant in your garden? Where do you  grow it?












36 comments:

  1. The color is so striking, especially amongs the lilac allium. I have never seen before. It's looked like single petal rose. Beautiful!

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    1. Yes, I like its color as well Endah.

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  2. Hi Nadezda, geums are new to me too, I got one last year and it is still in a pot, it is called Geum ‘Blazing Sunset’ – it should really have been planted in the ground because I think it has grown too big for the pot and needs more water than the pot can provide. They are lovely flowers and I like that you have so many, maybe I need to get some more to plant next to mine :-)

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    1. Helene, do not worry about Geum, when you plant it in a soil it will grow as mad. Then next year Geum will appear in different spots.

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  3. Hello Nadezda girl !
    I had a few varieties of geums in my garden .. the last one was Flames of Passion ? I'm not sure about that name .. but they are pretty little flowers and very tough and wow ! yours look amazing against the purple allium!
    You are right about these stones costing a lot more .. BIG sigh ... we learn from our mistakes ... that was a big learning curve to use a certified landscaper !
    Take care !
    Joy : )

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    1. Joy, sorry, we all make mistakes and be sure your paths are perfect now!

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  4. I bought three yellow geums this year and am waiting for the flowers,

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  5. I adore this plant and need to plant more too...they are perfect growing with alliums and geraniums...a perfect combo.

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  6. Boa tarde, belíssimas fotos das belas flores com lindas cores que encantam.
    AG

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    1. Gracias por visitar mi blog, A. Gomes!

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  7. Florido jardín amiga. Esa Geum coccineum se parece a las amapolas pero con más pétalos. Bonito color tienes.
    Buen lunes Nadezda ;)
    Bsos.

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  8. I love this color - it must look stunning in a mass!

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  9. This is so pretty Nadezda! I love Geum. I once planted the red 'Mrs Bradshaw' but it didn't come back after the first year. All I have are the common orange ones I love as well. They also bloom early in Spring. I think I might try and find one of the red varieties you're showing us here; maybe those would be stronger and survive the wet conditions during the winter in our garden? I love the combination with the purple Allium!

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    1. These two varieties are very hardy Marian therefor last winter here was wet and rainy with a bit of snow. All my Geums survived well.

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  10. So very pretty with the purple allium! I don't have this plant in my garden but it is quite cheerful and I admire it in the gardens of others.

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  11. I love these little orange / red geums -- I have a big patch of Cooky too. They are very reliable bloomers that go on forever, but this year was the first time they did not do well -- we had a very, very dry spring, no rain at all for over 33 days in April and May. They flowered, but were much smaller and only bloomed for a week or two. Usually, with enough rain, they are long-blooming happy plants!

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    1. You're right, Laurrie, all plants need rain, not drought.These little flowers are enough strong, as they survived in your garden so long dry season.

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  12. Hello Nadezda,
    your red avens looks gorgeous. I know only some of its wild relatives, and when I googled it, I learned that Geum does belong to Rosaceae. Indeed it looks like a pretty rose like Endah said above.
    As always, thank you for your interesting comment on my post. It's lovely that you had a song for ladybirds. We had a rhyme where we asked her to fly... :)

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    1. Yes, Sara they belong to family Rosaceae. But they are easily grown in our climate then roses:))

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  13. Beautiful plant Nadezda. I will look for it!

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  14. These look fantastic. One I will have to look out for.

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  15. Geum coccineum is a very beautiful plant.
    I had it once in your garden.
    Unfortunately, he disappeared.
    I was thrilled eyes your beautiful pictures.
    Greetings.

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    1. I'm glad Lucja you liked my photos, I tried to better show this small plant.

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  16. Oooo, thank you for showing me this wonderful flower. I had not idea of its existence until now. I think it goes beautifully with the purple allium.

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  17. Your orange Avens are lovely. I'm going to investigate if they'll grow at high altitude.

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  18. What a beautiful orange-red these flowers are.

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