Friday, April 15, 2016

GBBD in Mid-April 2016

Today is another one gardeners' day when we show what bloom and grow in our gardens. First of all these are crocus, hyacinth and Leucojum, here they are:


They are so lovely sprouting among dry leaves and grass. When all around is brown these small vernal flowers are bright blue, white and pink.
Although flowers pleased me I was upset inspecting roses. Some of floribunda badly wintered and I found their stems with black spots and dead. I've cut them so long until I saw live stem. Now some of roses look like this:

















                before pruning                                                                               after pruning

Despite of dead ones there are groundcover roses that are alive and have green branches. Here is groundcover "Swany":



Then I went to see berry bushes, it's a treat to see that small leaves are up from their green buds.




Meanwhile seedlings are growing well in my greenhouse, two weeks ago I had made some cuttings of Impatiens and sowed seeds of annual Dahlia.  They both grow fast on sunny shelves.  One impatiens has already roots  and started to bloom. What do you think - have I to leave this nice flower or better to cut it?




I have some tomato seedlings "St. Pierre" variety and I sowed celery in plastic glasses. I'm not sure if I have to plant these tiny celery seedlings in bigger pots or not, what is your experience?


That's all for now. What is growing and blooming in your garden in mid-April?

48 comments:

  1. I am sorry about the roses...but the other flowers are magnificent!!

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  2. There is a growing season already well under way;-) Here, it is still too cold, the plants have not yet surface. "Beef heart" tomato seedlings growing in pots. Greetings.

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    1. Sure your tomatoes will grow well in your garden, Anne. I know this variety.

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  3. Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day is a wonderful idea, but I couldn't participate even in April, because there's nothing blooming yet. :)
    You, in contrast, have beautiful flowers in your garden. The photo of the delicate little hyacinth looks just magical. I hope the roses will recover well.
    Have a beautiful weekend!

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    1. This was the first hyacinth, others started blooming as well.Your flowers will sprout soon I'm sure. Sara.

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  4. Fingers crossed for your roses! But they ar tough. Groetjes Hetty

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  5. It's a shame you have roses. Do you think they are completely dead or after hard pruning will they regrow?

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    1. I do hope they will regrow, Sue. At least I did the best pruning the dead wood and will food them soon.

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  6. I do hope the rose recovers from that heavy pruning Nadezda. It would be a shame to lose it. Your spring blooms are just lovely. I'd nip off the bloom from the Impatients - the plant is best spending it's energy to make roots rather than flowers.

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    1. You're Angie, I cut this bloom off, this one began to grow leaves.

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  7. I'm surprised to see lovely springflowers in your garden Nadezda, Your climate is so much colder. I do hope your roses are not going to die, I know they can be tough, so there's hope on the horizon.

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    1. I'm surprised as well Janneke: the weather is warm, +14..15 C, all plants are glad and grow well. But May maybe cold and when growth stops therefore let they to grow and to flower:) About roses I'm prepared to if they die and I bought new park roses, no more floribunda.

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  8. I had most of roses totally black also. Some I even couldn't see any green part of stem. But I hope until summer they'll come up. This warm autumn and suddenly came strong cold was too much for them.

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    1. I agree, January was too much cold for roses, Köögikata. I hope yours will recover as my roses.

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  9. I'm glad your roses are coming back after their pruning. I had to take two more roses out of my garden because I couldn't keep them disease-free without using chemicals. I wouldn't cut the impatiens bloom. I'd just enjoy it!

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    1. I've already nipped this flower, Tammy. About disease it's always a problem with roses: too cold, too wet, too drought, etc. Now I prefer special varieties for our cold and short season.

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  10. Hello Nadezda, sorry to hear you have had a problem with some of your roses – did you have less snow this winter to insulate your roses? I used to wrap my roses in hessian to protect them from frost when I still lived in Norway. The mild start to the winter has probably made it an excellent place for blackspot – maybe you don’t normally have that? Here in London we have blackspot all the time, year round and I have to deal with it all the time. I use a systemic, organic fungicide that lasts for 4-6 weeks and protects against blackspot. Great for roses and I use it on all the clematis too. The impatiens is lovely and it is tempting to keep the flower but I would have taken it away too – and when they all have 6-8 leaves I would have pinched out all the new end buds.

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    1. It's a good idea Helene to use a systemic, organic fungicide. I will look for it here. Blackspot isn't often disease in my garden, but this winter was awful for roses- they were wet 3 months and then strong frost was in January. Although roses were covered they were damaged.

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  11. Great to see that your roses and berry bushes show signs of life. Hope they will come good again. I love those dainty little blooms pushing up between old dead leaves and grass. Nature is wonderful!
    Have a great week ahead!

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  12. Nadezda-your spring blooms are lovely. Sorry to hear about your roses. Hopefully they will come back for you. There are products on the market for roses with a combination of rose food and systemic for fungal diseases that may help. Also, you had asked about the pine in my backyard. It is a dwarf white pine (Pinus strobus 'Blue Shag'). It grows to a mature height and width of about 4 feet over time. Happy Bloom Day!

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    1. I really liked your dwarf pine, Lee. Thank you for your very useful advice!

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  13. The Crocus in the gardens here at the lake have finally started to bloom. My real first sign of Spring - and I am loving it! JC

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  14. Hi Nadezda, sorry to hear about your roses... But spring surely has come to your garden. Surprised to see that your seeding pots! Actually, I've never grow vegetables so far, but this spring, I'm trying to grow tomato. So,look forward to seeing how your veges grows!

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    1. My tomato seedlings grow in pots until I replant them in a soil in the greenhouse. But I've seen tall tomatoes bushes potted in big tubs with matured tomatoes, Keity.

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  15. Nothing like seeing those first flowers of spring to lift your spirits! And the bee on the crocuses is an added bonus. Happy Spring!

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    1. Yes, Rose the first bees are looking for new flowers!

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  16. Hello Dear Nadezda
    I am charmed by your wonderful photos.
    You showed us the true kingdom of your garden.
    Great crocuses. For me already overblown.
    Celery overreacted to a larger pot.
    Discard creeper? Oh no!
    "St Pierre" I do not know the variety of tomato. It is tasty?
    Have a nice week.
    Kisses and greetings.
    Lucia

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    1. Lucja, tomato "St Pierre" is new to me, lets see the result :)
      I will replant celery to other bigger pots and in a soil very soon, thank you!

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  17. Is leujecum same as snow-drop? It's a beautiful flower. I would pinch of that impatient flower. Let its root grow much stronger. Then it can bloom. How many celery seedlings do you have in a small cup? If you have one, you can let it be in it, grow much bigger and stronger and then transplant.

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    1. KL, Leucojum is a small genus of bulbous plants belonging to the Amaryllis family, it very easyly propagates. Yes, I did this with impatient and it's taller now. There were 6 celery seedlings and now they are in 6 other pots.Thank you for your advice!

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  18. Spring has arrived in your garden! Hooray! Such beautiful flowers.

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  19. Wonderful! We have green buds on the lilacs and roses and the rhubarb is pushing up in the garden. Looks like your garden is off to a great start!

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    1. Mary Anne, I'm glad spring is in your garden as well!

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  20. Seu jardim já esta bonito.
    Tenho certeza que as roseiras sobreviverão e ficaram lindas.

    Bom fim de semana com tudo de bom!
    Beijinhos.♬♪ه° ·.
    💕ه° ·.

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  21. Hello Nadezda girl : )
    I am in the same position about having to cut back my roses, deeply ... this winter has been so hard on them. The Impatients flower on the cuttings I would cut off so all the strength goes into the root and actual plant stem etc ... but that is just my theory ? LOL
    You are so lucky to have a green house and see these little gems growing so well !
    Good luck with the berry bushes they look wonderful leafing out.
    Garden on Girl !
    Joy

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    1. Yes, Joy a green house is very useful at this time, weather is unpredictable. Impatience cuttings are growing well and fast, I cut the flowers off. Thank you for your advice!

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  22. What a delight to see all those signs of life. I especially love the crocuses. Here it doesn't get cold enough for them.

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    1. Now crocuses are still in bloom, Juliet but their time is ending. Many tulips start flowering.

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