Saturday, June 23, 2018

Drosera

Drosera, commonly known as the sundew, is one of the largest carnivorous plants. The insects are used to supplement the poor mineral nutrition of the soil in which the plants grow. Various species, which vary greatly in size and form, are native to every continent except Antarctica. The English common name 'sundew' refer to the glistening drops at the tip of each tentacle that resemble drops of morning dew. 



The round-leaved sundew that I have found in the nearest bog is a specie of this carnivorous plant. It may be found in bogs, marshes, fens and is the most widespread sundew of northern Europe, much of Siberia.


The plant feeds on insects, which are attracted to the glistening drops loaded with a sugary substance, covering its leaves. It 's carnivorous behaviour in response to usually poor in nutrients soils. The plant uses enzymes to dissolve the insects which become stuck to the  tentacles and extract nutrients from their bodies. (wiki)
I first saw sundew in the bog close to the river, where I often walk (read 'All the rivers run'). In general, I was looking for wild strawberries, because they usually ripen in June. 


Lovely wild berries and very sweet.

 
Having read in detail about the behavior of the sundew, I thought that if it were larger and consumed more bloodsucking insects causing harm to people, pets and livestock then mosquitoes and horseflies would not even be in the garden :-)  What is your opinion?



 

47 comments:

  1. It always seems amazing that plants can be carnivorous and I find it fascinating. We now have local strawberries here too and they are delicious. There is no comparison with the imported stuff.

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    1. I agree David, local strawberries tastier than imported berries.

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  2. Preciosas fotos Nadezda y interesantes plantas. Aquí la Drosera crece en sitios con bastante altitud y la conocemos como Rocío del Sol. Feliz fin de semana y feliz verano. Besos.

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    1. Wow, este crece en Asturias tambien, es interesante, Lola!

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  3. Very beautiful photos Nadezda! The drosera is a very cosmopolitan plant, it also grow in the cold southern provinces of Argentina and Chile. Have a great weekend!

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    1. I've not known that Drosera grows in Latin America, really it's worldwide plant.

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  4. Fantastic post about the sundew. In Holland it's a protectet plant.
    Have a wonderful week ahead.
    Marijke

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    1. Maybe it's a protected plant here too, Marijke. Anyway sundew rarely appears in the woods here.

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  5. It's fascinating to observe this plant! I did not know that this plant lives in the wild!
    Happy weekend !

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    1. Yes, it's amazing Ela.
      Have a nice weekend!

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  6. Hello Nazdezda!

    It's a very special plant you show today. I don't know the Sundew, but it's a strange plant.
    Happy Midsummer!

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    1. You're right, Marit, it's a special plant, carnivorous one. Sure it may be found near Oslo as well.

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  7. Great plant! In our home, drought destroyed that plant.Have a nice weekend

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    1. It's a pity, Anne. Hopefully some sundew survive there.
      Happy Saturday!

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  8. If only the insect eating plant could be trained to be selective.

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    1. Ha ha, Sue, love your English sense of humor!

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  9. Hello Dear Nadezda!
    These plants are amazing.Thank you very much for interesting information.
    I love strawberries, the smell is wonderful.
    Happy weekend.
    Lucja

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    1. I do love strawberries, Lucja. I'm glad you liked the information,
      happy Saturday!

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  10. Las droseras también las hay en diferentes lugares de Extremadura. Me encantan las fresas silvestres. Besitos y feliz domingo.

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  11. Wow, in my region grows no Drosera! ( We have clay soil.) Lovely to discover so many on a stroll. And the strawberries... they are yammie! Love the colours of the two plants together on your post. Did you noticed that? Groetjes, Hetty

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    1. I do love colors and taste of wild strawberries, Hetty. When I gather a lot I will cook jam :-)
      Have a nice Monday!

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  12. Interesting post, Nadezda. I'm sure you had a lovely walk to nature! :)

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    1. Yes, I had Tistou,
      have a nice week!

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  13. Boa tarde, certamente que o seu passeio para apreciar e fotografara natureza foi maravilhoso, as plantas e os morangos silvestres, resultaram em belas fotos.
    Feliz semana,
    AG

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    1. Gracias, Antonio, que te gustaron mis fotos.

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  14. I love carnivorous plants! We have a collection that includes sundews, my favorite. We also have sarracinnias and Venus fly traps too.

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    1. Oh, Rebecca, your collection's very interesting! I know the plant sarracenias, it was an indoor plant before, but now it's not.
      Happy week!

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  15. Curious carnivora plant. I like wild strawberries!
    Happy week!

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    1. So do I Tania! When the wild strawberry crop is good I cook jam, it's very yummy.

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  16. These plants are so fascinating, and good subjects for horror films. Marked contrast with delicious wholesome wild strawberries, so preferable to eat rather than be eaten!

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    1. Well said, catmint! I do prefer to eat berries,
      happy Tuesday!

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  17. I did not know the explanation of the name "sundew", but I already know. I also think that if there were a lot of them, the insects would be less. Wild strawberries are delicious and aromatic, thank you for a nice comment with me and best regards.

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    1. I agree Giga, wild strawberry is aromatic, I love it too.
      Hugs!

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  18. I love the look of sundew but find it hard to fall in love with the plants themselves. I think they'd never stop eating if they ate mosquitoes! In Ireland kids used to pick the wild strawberries and put them on a long, tough grass stalk, and then eat them one at a time in that way. I don't know why that seems nicer than just putting them in your mouth :)

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    1. What an interesting way to eat wild strawberries, Jenny. I love eating them from the cup with milk :-)
      Take care, hopefully your leg is better.

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  19. Beautiful photos, Nadezda. I have not seen this plant. Years ago I bought a Venus Flytrap for my children when they were young. Unfortunately, they overfed it and as you can imagine, it was killed with kindness!
    The wild strawberries look ripe and must be delicious.
    Enjoy the week-end.
    Betty

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    1. Ha ha, Betty, your children overfed Venus Flytrap, amazing! I can imagine no one fly left in your house.
      The berries are really very juicy and tasty.
      Happy weekend,dear!

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  20. I did not know this plant, a Sundew apart from being beautiful it turns out to be useful in the garden eliminating some insects.
    Lovely photos.
    Have a happy Sunday.
    Many greetings
    Maria
    Divagar Sobre Tudo um Pouco

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    1. I did knew it and was surprised to find Sundew in the woods where I often walk. Maria.
      Have a nice New week!

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  21. It's very rare to see sundew around my area. I have not thought about it for a long time. Thanks for your nice post.

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    1. You're welcome, roughterrain crane!
      Happy new week!

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  22. Quelle sono davvero le fragole più buone di tutte! Le drosere sono sempre bellissime, a volte si vedono anche qui :)

    Buona Domenica!

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    1. Si, me gusta tambien, pontos.
      Feliz la semana nueva.

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  23. Olá, venho desejar-lhe feliz semana com lindas flores e morangos silvestres.
    Abraço,
    AG

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  24. This is such an interesting plant that I have never seen before, and your photographs of it are outstanding! The wild berries also look delicious. You have taught this gardener something new!

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