Saturday, October 6, 2018

Skansen: Allotments


I continue to tell you about the open-air museum Skansen situated on the island in the center of Stockholm, the capital of Sweden. There you can find objects reflecting the life of people of northern Europe in the 19 - 20th centuries: whole streets of wooden houses, sheds, mills, churches, ponds, various workshops, the rose garden, animal farms with cows, horses, geese, hens, etc. It's joy and pleasure for adults and children.
Of course it was interesting to see the garden allotments of the early 20th century. These ones appeared in Sweden immediately after the First World War. Around the turn of the 1900th century associations for letting allotments to working-class families were established. During the First World War there were shortages of potatoes and other staple foods in the cities.



Several such allotments were allocated in the vicinity of the city park Tanto, but later the number of garden plots increased, as people enthusiastically began to cultivate not only potatoes, but also other vegetables, and soon flowers appeared there.






Then it was legislatively allowed to build a small hut or a shelter on the allotment, where working families could spend the night during seasonal work. At the same time, there were strict rules governing the size and appearance of the huts. For example they could only be painted red, yellow or white.
I tried to take the detailed pictures of allotments and houses, vegetable and flower beds with tomatoes, a rock with strawberry bushes growing on it, glass greenhouse with vegetables.




It's really interesting Open air museum and was also amazing to know how a hundred years ago people relaxed on the porches of their houses after work, to see their garden furniture, tidy paths, nets around veggies, tubs with flowers, watering cans and other domestic stuff.


Here is my video about allotments:



 
and about Swedish farm animals in 19-20th centuries:






source: Skansen

35 comments:

  1. I very much enjoyed seeing these allotments with huts. What a wonderful idea! We have something similar called community gardens but most do not have huts for summer sleeping.

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    1. I think, Peter, allotments created ago or community gardens didn't have got huts, as well it was here in Russia. But by a time when people had to work hard since dawn to sunset to grow veggies for their table they had been allowed to build huts.

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  2. Надежда,интересная прогулка,теплицы,инвентарь..А у меня еще есть железная лейка(или оцинкованная),,пользуюсь ...

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    1. Надо же, Надежда, какой у вас есть антиквариат :-) У меня только пластиковые, они по-легче.

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  3. Hello dear Nadezda!
    Such beautiful pictures of the preety huts and the gardens ! A lovely treat for the eyes!
    You can see something like that here in the villages! Thank you for sharing!
    The deer in my photo is sleeping in the Hague’s park!
    Wishing you a lovely day and a happy weekend!
    Dimi...

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    1. What a nature, Dimi! The deer isn't scared to sleep not far from the strolling people in the park. I can't see the same here, deer are afraid to come close to the people's houses or parks.
      Interestingly there are the same allotments in The Netherlands.

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    2. Hello dear Nadezda! Thank you very much for your kind comment on my post!
      This is the recipe!
      http://www.spoonforkbacon.com/2017/12/sunken-german-apple-cake/
      Good luck making it!Have a lovely week!
      Dimi...

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  4. Hello Nadezda!

    Beautiful photos from Sweden! Similar garden allotments are here in Norway too. Open air museum is so nice. Very interesting.
    Happy weekend!

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    1. I'm glad Marit you liked my photos. This museum is interesting, you're right.
      Hugs!

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  5. Nadezda - I enjoyed my trip with you to Skansen. Hope you are able to get out in your garden this weekend.

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    1. Yes, I could. The weather wasn't warm but no rain and cold wind. The garden is nice in this season.
      Thank you!

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  6. One big difference between those allotments and those here is that we are not allowed to spend the night there and some sites don't even allow a shed. Were the allotments so far from home that they needed to stay?

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    1. Sue, as I learned from the booklet, these allotments were situated in the vicinity of the city park, not far from the Stockholm center. As people were in shortage of the food, theyhard worked and needed to sleep on the allotments to start their work early in the morning. I do not know where the workers lived.

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  7. Orto e erbe incredibili! Tutto tenuto benissimo :)

    Un caro saluto!

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  8. Hello Nadezda!
    Beautiful garden plots. Great pictures you brought from Sweden.
    I like them very much.
    Happy week.
    Lucja

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  9. Wonderful place, great photos.
    Have a nice Sunday
    Hugs
    Maria
    Divagar Sobre Tudo um Pouco

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  10. Me parece muy interesante y bonito. Besos.

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  11. Interesante entrada Nadezda. Las fotos me encantan y la infornación estupenda.
    Te deseo una buena senmana.
    Besos.

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  12. Hola Nadezda, muy interesante todo lo que nos comentas y las fotos muy bonitas. Feliz semana y un fuerte abrazo

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    1. Lola, que pases bien el resto de semana,
      besos!

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  13. I like those garden cabins, Nadezda. They are beautiful!
    I wish you a good week!

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    1. Yes, they are pretty ones, Tania,
      thank you!

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  14. I would like to tend a garden in this lovely environment. I think it would be easy to find friends of like mind in these allotments. I like how they are growing tomatoes in pot with marigolds to keep away pests.
    It's good that the public can see how to grow vegetables and flowers in small garden areas.
    Your videos are beautiful
    Thank you for sharing with us.
    Betty

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    1. Betty, I liked this museum Skansen as well, where the people's life in 19-20th centuries is demonstrated. Of course they were friends and good neighbors in these small allotments.
      Glad you liked my videos, thank you!

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  15. Nadezda, what beautiful place you visited! I love the swedish cottage style, I grew up admiring the swedish gardens in books, they are just enchanting! I wish I could replicate their planting here.. sigh! Thanks for sharing!

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    1. You're welcome Manolo, hopefully there is a Swedish corner in your garden :-)

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  16. What an interesting place to visit! I think I could live in one of these little cottages all summer long:) Community gardens, as we often call them, are growing in popularity here in the U.S., as people realize the benefits of growing their own food.

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    1. They are right, Rose, growing their own food is a pleasure and use. I'm glad you're with us in blogs, I see you spent well this summer.

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