Sunday, February 3, 2019

Flowers Decorate Shawls

Recently I've been to a new exhibition “Shawls and Scarves” at the State Russian Museum, St. Petersburg. I did not expect that I would be so impressed by exhibits there. Well, I will tell and show you the most interesting things there.

Square scarf 'Reps' 19th century

 Throw, lace, 19th century

For the first time a unique assortment of ancient and modern Russian textiles is presented in State Russian museum, St. Petersburg. The shawls, throws and kerchiefs are shown as parts of old traditional costumes. In 18 century in the northern city of Kargopol gold embroidery on white thin linen shawls and scarves was developed. They were part of the elegant costume of northern women. Gold threads are attached to the fabric with silk threads, that have a clear pattern on sewing.

Female festive costumes, late 19th century

Fragment of embroidered shawl of a bride, silk, gold


Fragment of embroidered kerchief, silk

As a rule, the corner of a kerchief was decorated with large embroidery, a kerchief was fixed under the chin, leaving free corners on shoulders. In the years 1860-80, the most elegant kerchiefs with rich ornamentation appeared.


 The kerchief, gold threads, fabric, Kargopol, 19 century  

 Triangular kerchief, gold threads, fabric, Kargopol, 19 century

 The kerchief, gold threads, Kargopol, 19 century

Attending church, celebration, harvesting – all these required the proper type of feminine head covering.  In 18-19th centuries fashionable costume of a lady or merchant’s wife was incomplete without a flower-patterned shawl or kerchief.


 Merchant's wife in a festive costume, Toropets, 19th century


Fragment of embroidered headscarf, gold, silver threads, silk


Part of embroidered kerchief, silk


 Fragment of embroidered kerchief, silver threads, silk


Fragment of embroidered shawl, silver threads, silk

Makers of scarves and shawls imported new textile and technology to Russia in 18 century. The art of silk weaving from Middle East influenced the textile manufacturing in towns of Kolomna, Vladimir, Toropets, Bogoevlensk.  


  Embroidered bride's shawl, silk


Fragment of embroidered bride's throw, silk

At the beginning of the 19th century, a square scarf appeared, a pattern woven with gold and silver thread replaced the oriental patterns, and a border appeared at the edges. Manufactures in the cities of Zuev, Shchelkovo, Kolomna produced scarves with complex patterns. Brocade kerchiefs and shawls were part of the ceremonial women's attire in the merchants and among wealthy peasants.

Throw, silver threads, 19th century

Fragment of the throw


The evolution of this manufacture from the time of Catherine the Great to elegant modern shawls, throws and kerchiefs is due to the development of the textile industry in the country.

Next post I'll continue showing you beautiful things. 


Click to enlarge photos.



51 comments:

  1. Unfortunately all your comments were deleted due my careless. I'm very sorry.

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  2. Laura.M
    Que maravilla amiga. Me ha encantado verlas. Siempre que puedo voy a estos eventos. Son espectaculares. Tus fotos muy buenas.
    Te deseo buena semana.
    Besos.

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    Replies
    1. Gracias, Laura. me encanta que te gustaron estas bufandas, hechas hace 2 siglos.

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  3. Existe Sempre Um Lugar
    Bom dia, A maravilhosa arte que partilha é linda, imagino as horas de trabalho que cada linda peça tralhada tem, devem de ser muitas e muitas, certamente que a exposição foi um sucesso.
    AG

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    1. Thank you, Antonio, you correctly pointed out, that any of these works needed hours to achieve such a great result.
      Hugs!

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  4. La Biosfera de Lola
    Que bonito Nadezda, realmente son espectaculares, cuánto trabajo, muchas gracias por mostrarnoslo. Un beso.

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    1. Por favor Lola. Me gusta que hayas disfrutado esta visita virtual.

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  5. Giga
    To be at a great exhibition, to look at and admire scarves and beautifully decorated scarves is a big experience. Greetings.

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    1. Yes, it is, Giga. I do think it is a great exhibition.

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  6. Sara - Villa Emilia
    Hello Nadezda and thank you for showing us these incredibly beautiful textiles. They are real treasures.
    Thank you also for your comment today. It was lovely to know you like Inspector Morse too. :) Have you seen the series on TV, DVD, streaming...?

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    Replies
    1. Sara, I've watched Inspector Morse on TV. Glad you liked the exhibition.

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  7. Sara - Villa Emilia
    Hello again! Do you see these series dubbed in Russian or with subtitles?

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    1. Generally I watch them on TV, where all films are dubbed but if I watch them on stream I prefer with subtitles to listen to the language, Sara.

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  8. David Gascoigne

    Looks like a really fabulous exhibit, Nadezda. I am away in Costa Rica right now, but will be home by Thursday and back to blogging again by next weekend.

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    1. I'm waiting for your new post on Costa Rica birds, David.

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  9. Southern Rural Route

    Nadezda -- Very beautiful scarves with gold threads. Your command of the English language continues to impress me because I don't think I would do as well trying to learn Russian. For starters, your alphabet contains at least one character that our alphabet doesn't have. Looks like a cursive R. I'd get lost right there! Just for educational purposes, your sentence "Attending church, celebration, harvesting – all these required the proper type of woman head covering" would flow better if you used the word feminine instead of woman. But you are way ahead of me in the languages department.

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    1. Thank you linda. I love learning, so I corrected the phrase. Glad you liked scarves. The character Я is simple one, it means 'I' and pronounces as 'ya' in the word 'yam'

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  10. Marit Sønstebø

    Hello Nadezda!

    Very beautiful exhibit. It must have taken a very long time to make this embroidery.
    Hugs!

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    1. Oh yes, Marit, you are right. I suppose in the 18-19 centuries the nuns and serf women had a lot of time to embroider such beautiful things.

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  11. Lisa Greenbow

    I imagine during those long dark cold winter days the people had plenty of time to embroider these works of art. They are amazing. Wouldn't you feel so glamorous with such an elaborate shawl or kerchief. I love the picture of the woman with the head dress as well as the kerchief and shawl. Even her dress appears to be embroidered. Gosh I couldn't afford one of these beauties now let alone way back then. Thank you so much for showing these beautiful works of art.

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    1. Lisa, When I've seen the scarf (first photo) I fell in love with it. It's very elegant, with the fine ornament and combination of colors. It was a pleasure to see all these beauties at the museum. Glad you liked my post.

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  12. Sue Garrett

    They are beautiful but I wouldn’t fancy having to wear one of those headdresses.

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    1. Sue, they are at the museum, not for wearing. Only to show how women embroidered 200 year ago.

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    2. Sue Garrett

      Didn’t they wear them in the past though?

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    3. Of course they did. Now we perceive these exhibits as a work of art, but I'd like to put on the first scarf on my woolen coat, as it goes well to it :-)

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  13. Maria Rodrigues

    Excellent photographic report.
    Wonderful pieces, precious works of art.
    Warm hugs
    Maria

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    1. Maria, thanks and I'm glad you liked the exhibits.

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  14. Teresa


    Se ven maravillosos Nadezda, me encantan. En España los hay parecidos. Besitos.

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    1. Qué interesante que existan bufandas similares en España, Teresa.
      Besos!

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  15. Anne Hagman-Niilola

    Oh, how beautiful! Have a nice week Nadezda;-)

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  16. ♥ Łucja-Maria ♥

    Hello Dear Nadezda!
    Beautiful shawls and scarves.
    I would gladly visit this exhibition.
    Nadezda, great pictures.

    Happy week.
    Hugs and greetings.
    Lucja

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    1. Lucja, perhaps this exhibition will be shown in Poland as well. Not now :( but in future.

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  17. Endah Murniyati


    Those are so beautiful!

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  18. Lee@A Guide to Northeastern Gardening

    These exhibits are exquisite and such beautiful works of art. Thank you for sharing this.

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    Replies
    1. You're welcome, Lee. Glad you have valued so much the exhibits.

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  19. MDN

    Nadezda, I love these pictures! I really like these textiles, they are artworks! with my sister we collect old Barbie dolls and we sew clothes for them. I haven't posted anything lately in the blog because January is the hottest month and I don't spend much time in the garden, but I will be posting something soon! happy february!

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    1. Glad you're OK Manolo. The autumn comes soon in your place, your garden will blossom well.

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  20. Jenny Woolf

    I think there is something very touching about these textiles because there is great artistry and craftsmanship to be seen here, and yet the people who created these masterpieces are quite probably anonymous. Womens work was not valued enough I think. I wish we could know the names of all the women who have made these beautiful objects. At least their work lives after them.

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    1. You're very very right, Jenny. The unknown women mostly nuns or serf women created these masterpieces, now we in 21 century can enjoy their work. Thank you!

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  21. Vagabonde

    Hello Nadezda – these kerchieves and shawls are exquisite. They are also very delicate. Women used to embroider in days past. At school in France when I was little I remember they taught us how to embroider – I don’t think they do that anymore. Kids rather spend times looking at their cell phones! I am still going back and forth to Georgia to finish cleaning out the house but I think it will take a long time to finish. Jim’s birthday was February 2nd so not to feel too sad I decided to visit all my friends’ blogs and it gives me a lot of comfort as I don’t know anyone here in Nashville and my daughter and family are away right now. I hope your weather is not too cold like it has been here in the Midwest – not here in the South, though. Thanks for coming to my blog when I was unable to visit blogs.

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    1. I like, Vagabonde that you decided to come to my blog although you felt sadness on Jim's birthday. Yes we both were taught to embroider in our childhood, but I was no very enthusiastic :-) The weather here is not as cold as in the Midwest, and you were not suffering frost as well, it's good!
      Thanks for coming!

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  22. outlawgardener

    Such beautiful and intricate work. Thank you for sharing these gorgeous textiles!

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  23. Dear Nadezda,
    I have enjoyed looking at these beautiful shawls and scarves. So delicate with their gold and silk thread. Many hours of work. Thank you for showing us these special exhibits from your State Russian Museum.
    It has been very hot here, but cooler today and for a few more days to come. I hope you are keeping warm and enjoying time to do your own embroidery.
    I have been wondering how is your son in Chicago with such cold temperatures?

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    1. You're welcome, Betty. I'm glad is getting colder in your place.The weather in Chicago is finally not too cold as it was. This winter I've not embroidered, had no the pattern I liked. I'm in search!

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  24. Hello Nadezda!
    Wonderful embroideries, they are work of art. They are similar to spanish mantillas.
    Good new week!

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    Replies
    1. I didn't know that Russian shawls are similar to mantillas, Tania.What's interesting!
      Hugs!

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  25. Such wonderful scarves and shawls.

    All the best Jan

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