Wednesday, May 29, 2019

Fritillaria & Mahonia

Fritillaria is a pretty bulb plant which name means a cup for dice, has also popular names 'snake's head' or 'chess flower'. The plant is represented by 179 species, common in the temperate zone of Europe, Asia and North America. Places of growth of different species can be separated from each other for thousands of kilometers and be in different climatic and natural conditions.


I grow Fritillaria of two species: white Fritillaria Meleagris alba and Fritillaria
Meleagris beautifully marked. Meleagris alba grow between tujas since many years. I'd planted 5 bulbs of the 'chess flower' Fritillaria last year. As you see the only one of these Frittilaria bulbs  blooms, others have no buds.



Fritillaria bulbs should be always planted in groups of one species, imitating natural clusters of plants. Large species are magnificent in single planting, especially since they bloom much earlier than other ornamental flowers. 




Low species look better in rock gardens. Fritillaria of especially small species are grown in pots, several plants can be grown in one container.

My another plant of this post is Мahonia aquifolia. This plant is found in the west of North America, in forests and on slopes. It's enough drought resistant, evergreen shrub up to 1.5 m tall, has interesting large, leathery, shiny leaves.




In my garden Mahonia blooms from mid-May for a month, sometimes blooms again in October. Elliptical, dark blue edible, sweet-sour fruits up to 1 cm ripen in August or September if weather is not warm enough. Thus the bush gets a unique originality.




Mahonia is a cross-pollinated plant. I grow 2 plants and they yet have not had fruits. But they say that if cross-pollination is successful, then the plant may be covered with fruits. So I will wait for the berries :-).



Do you grow these plants in your garden or balcony? What is your experience?

36 comments:

  1. I love your Fritillaria and Mahonia Nadezda. I am very familiar with Mahonia. We plant it here in zone 7 in areas of partial shade and the blooms in spring add a nice touch to a dark area. I have not planted Fritillaria and will need to look into it. Have a great week!

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    Replies
    1. I planted Mahonia in shady spot as well Lee. It overwinters well here in zone 5.
      Best wishes!

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  2. I think your Fritillaria are fabulous.
    Lovely to see all of your photographs - your garden is growing well.

    All the best Jan

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  3. Надежда,у меня были рябчики белый и шахматный.Но не размножился сильно.А при перепланировке сада потерялся,,может еще проявится.Интересное и нежное растение.
    У махонии цветы похожи на цветки барбариса.
    Прекрасные фотографии,красивый у вас сад!

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    Replies
    1. Магония - интересное растение, зимует хорошо только под слоем снега, выше - может вымерзать. Цветы должны дать ягоды, съедобные, но их пока не было, Надежда :-)

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  4. Hello dear Nadezda,

    Fritillaria meleagris is one of my favorite bulbs, and I love the white one very much.
    Your garden looks so pretty, and I regret that I don't have Mahonia. The yellow flowers are so beautiful.
    Hugs!

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    Replies
    1. I do hope to see and to show you later the Mahonia berries, Marit.
      Hugs!

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  5. Your garden is very beautiful, Nadezda, obviously tended with loving care.

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  6. I do not have theses plants on my balcony. They are so beautiful. I truly love such posts because I love nature I love gardens and I love reading posts full od passion. :)
    Have a nice day dear Nadezda, besr regards. :)

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  7. I love that checkered Frit. I have tried to grow it here before and it didn't take. I do have Fritillaria uva-vulpis. It likes it in my garden. I planted a few bulbs in one flower bed and it has gone all over the flower bed by itself. Mahonia is a plant that doesn't winter over here. You must keep yours in your greenhouse for the winter or there is a hardy variety that I am not aware of. Your spring bulbs look so pretty together. Happy Spring.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lisa, I can imagine your pretty Fritillaria bed. I grow Мahonia aquifolia, it overwinters well under snow level. I do not keep it in the greenhouse, it is hardy enough.
      Hugs!

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  8. Tus plantas se ven muy bonitas. Mahonia la tengo en mí jardín, aunque las hojas son un poco distintas. Las flores son iguales y a mí si me dieron fruto. Tengo una entrada preparada. Besos.

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    Replies
    1. Oh Teresa, has disfrutado de los frutos de Mahonia. Espero tenerlos este año.
      Besos!

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  9. Two of my favorite plants. I grow both, including some interesting mahonia hybrids. Your garden is looking beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Peter! I'm very very glad you are with us blogging, hope you're recovering now.
      Hugs!

      Delete
  10. I’m thinking of growing Moro fritillaries next year. Did you plant bulbs or plants in the green as for snowdrops.

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    Replies
    1. Sue, I don't grow these Fritillarias because they are capricious and my wet soil doesn't suit them.

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  11. Me encantan amiga. Las tienes todas preciosas.
    La foto 5ª es una belleza de colores Nadezda
    Te deseo un buen fin de semana.
    Un abrazo.

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    Replies
    1. En esta foto puedes ver jacintos, tulipanes, thujas y una pequeña fritillaria, Laura.
      La naturaleza nos da muchos colores.

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  12. Надежда, очень красивые фотографии! Понравился рябчик белый- такой нежный и даже хрупкий, а шахматный я вижу, вообще, в первый раз.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Рябчики вообще не очень популярны у нас, Людмила из-за их прихотливости, часто вымокания и вымерзания. Шахматный рябчик считаеся натуральным (ботаническим) видом, но у меня появился первый год.

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  13. Oh very cute flowers darling
    xx

    *Please don´t publish links on my blog

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  14. Beautiful plants in your garden, Nadezda.
    Happy weekend for you!
    Hugs!

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  15. I do not grow these plants Nadezda. I once had s small pot of white Fritillaria but I think I neglected it with not enough water during summer. I'm sure they would grow here in the right conditions.
    Have a good week-end Nadezda.

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    Replies
    1. You're right Betty. Fritillaria is not easy in growth. The only rain waters it in my garden in summer :-)
      best wishes!

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  16. You are enjoying beautiful spring flowers. Have a nice new week.

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  17. Beautiful Fritillarias, Nadezda!
    I have never tried to grow them. We had (well, still have) a Mahonia in our Italian garden. I didn't care much about the yellow flowers but the leaves are really very beautiful. :)
    Have a happy week ahead!

    ReplyDelete

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