Tuesday, October 1, 2013

It's October, Time To Go On Mushrooms Picking

            Many people like walking in the woods, picking berries and mushrooms. But not everyone is convinced that the collected berries and mushrooms are edible. If edible berries are easy to remember, you're constantly in doubt with mushrooms: to take it or do not? That is the question. And the answer is always simple: if you do not know this mushroom, you are not sure, in doubt - do not take it! I go not often for mushrooms. They do not grow continuously, the harvest depends on the rain, night temperatures, sunshine and the number of mushroom hunters per square meter.

'When fall time comes, I'm always glad
To go mushroom hunting with my friend
Walking in the woods on a cool, fall day
Taking in the beauty of God's display
It's just like a treasure hunt to me
Searching for those gems amongst the leaves
What a thrill, when one I think I spy
But it's just a leaf, so I pass on by
Then at last, I spot a beauty
And by it's side, three little cuties
A pinch to the stems, then placed in my sack
I hope to fill it till there's no more slack'

Here some edible mushrooms were picked this fall.


First on the list is a cep, or white cep (Boletus edulis or Boletus pinophilus), the most valuable one (in the center). His hat is light or dark brown (if growing in pine forests), light brown foot. How to use it? Fresh ceps can be fried, pickled, dried for winter.
The second one is an orange-cap boletus or aspen mushroom ( Leccinum aurantiacum), beautiful mushroom, conspicuous from a distance, unless of course, it is not hiding in the grass! It has an orange-cap (on the left of this photo). Orange-cap boletus grows in deciduous forests, under the aspens, in the grass. These fresh mushrooms can be fried or boiled, you can pickle or preserve, can be dried for winter.
Here is another boletus that often comes across to mushroom hunters in the woods (top, on the left). 


This is saffron milk cap (Boletus Lactarius). Saffron milk cap mushroom, as well as milk mushroom, belong to the group of mushrooms those are necessary to boil before use, pickling or salting.The mushrooms on the right are honey agarics.
I love honey agarics mushrooms (Armillariella mellea). Funny groups can be found on cutting areas, on stumps and trunks of trees. Honey agarics choose birch stumps, they grow up and destroy the base.
In my garden some years ago an old birch tree was cut down, but not completely, and high stump remained. Over the years, honey agarics mushrooms settled on the stump (how did mycelium get there?). 


Yesterday they were not there; and today the whole stump is strewn with young mushrooms. I fry them or cook soup, but I basically freeze them for winter. Here is a plate of fresh fried honey agarics, dressing with tomatoes, cucumbers and parsley. 




Bon appetite!

'Wild Mushrooms cooked in sauce
garlic, spices and wine
expensive olive oil
adding capers now
simmer until done
Wild food
Great!!'

43 comments:

  1. Yummy! I love mushrooms - especially sauteed :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. I see so many mushrooms in the woods, but I am unfortunately clueless about them, so I have to leave them there. I need to get myself educated!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tracey, it's a pleasure strolling in the woods picking mushrooms. If I'm not sure ---don't pick them. Thank you!

      Delete
  3. I love mushrooms too. My dad used to take me mushroom picking as a child on Sunday mornings to a country park which housed a herd of cows. He always said the mushrooms were better from a cow field. Not sure why but he always advised me about picking unknown mushrooms - if in doubt leave them out! Love your photos Nadezda.
    Patricia x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Patricia, your dad was right! I think the soil in a cow field was fertilized and mushrooms were better Thank you!

      Delete
  4. You are so knowledgeable about wild mushrooms, Nadezda. I wish I knew more about them but since I'm ignorant, I simply enjoy looking at them. Your last picture looks delicious!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Peter, I know only some species of edible mushrooms! I love looking at them, in the woods and on the plate too. Thank you!

      Delete
  5. What a magnificent mushroom pictures. I don't know much about edible mushrooms in the wild, so I better buy them on the farmer's market. The poem is just lovely reading.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I usually buy shampinions in a supermarket. The wild mushrooms, particularly honey agarics I pick in my garden stump, they are ecological.Thank you Janneke!

      Delete
  6. Welcome Nadezda!
    Ummm, I love to collect and eat mushrooms.
    This year, I was once on mushrooms. I have little time to go again.
    Fantastic photos.
    I send greetings.
    Lucia

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lucia, I've seen your mushroom harvest in your blog and I loved the dried ceps you made. Thank you!

      Delete
  7. Oh I wish I had your knowledge about mushrooms. I try to go foraging for mushrooms with someone who knows what they are doing and each year I learn a little more; but I swear I will never have the confidence to eat any of my finds. The last photo made me drool!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. GS, I agree, it's difficult to recognize many species of wild mushrooms. Thank you for dropping by!

      Delete
  8. Lovely! I miss going on mushroom picking, I used to do it when I lived in Norway, here in London it is a bit difficult...although I have some mushrooms in my garden right now, but I don't recognise them and have no idea if they are edible. I keep to the ones from my supermarket!
    Your photos are lovely, brings back memories, I can almost smell them :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Helene, of course, you know well many species of mushrooms, the woods of Norway are rich of berries and mushrooms. Now, I agree is better to buy them in supermarket. Thank you!

      Delete
  9. Our relatives in Latvia do this. The most popular are Gailenites - (chanterelles?). Anyway - the are indescribably delicious. But you're right - some are dangerous so only pick what you know! Gorgeous pictures, Nadezda.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Astrid, I know Gailenites, they are ecological mushrooms. We call them 'foxes' here, because they're red as a fox. Thank you!

      Delete
  10. Wow those mushrooms are really cool :) Such awesome shapes!! I've never foraged for mushrooms I know nothing about them. Nice to read your post :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Dear Nadezda,
    I too love mushroom hunting! I saw a really nice big field mushroom on the way to school today but alas, on the way home I see someone else got there before me.
    I do like chanterelles. Here in Germany they call them Pfifferlinge.
    Actually we had some nice brown wood mushrooms with our chicken dinner this evening!
    Bye for now
    Kirk

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like chanterelles too, and when have them enough, make soup: boil some potatoes, carrots and then add fried chanterelles with onions. Yummy!
      Thank you, Kirk!

      Delete
  12. I love mushrooms, particularly dried to use as seasoning in roasts or stews.
    But I am never certain about picking them in the wild.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, dried mushrooms, especially ceps, are very tasty. I love to add them in meat souse too. Thank you, Friko!

      Delete
  13. Beautiful and interesting photos Nadezda. That dish of cooked mushrooms looks delicious. I love them!
    Betty

    ReplyDelete
  14. Great pictures you show. I ♥ to walk in the woods and look at the beautiful mushrooms .... but plugging them. Wish you a good Thursday / good weekend :) Hanne Bente

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, have a nice day, Hanne Bente!

      Delete
  15. Que aproveche....Que pinta más buenaaaa!!!!!!
    El otoño nos trae buenos regalos como, estas estas ricas setas, pero hay que tener cuidado son ellas y saber diferenciarlas.
    Un beso

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Es verdad, el otono nos trae regalos, no solamente lluvias y el viento frio. Gracias, Laura!

      Delete
  16. I love mushrooms!!!Great pictures Nadezda!!!
    I 'll try to cook your recipe!!!It looks delicious!!!
    Have a lovely weekend!!!
    Dimi...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm sure your mushrooms will taste great, Dimi! thank you!

      Delete
  17. Buenos días Nadezda:))
    Te dejo este enlace. La escultura representa las armas heráldicasde Madrid es todo un símbolo y esta en la pueta del Sol.
    Un beso

    http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Estatua_del_Oso_y_el_Madro%C3%B1o

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gracias, Laura! Cuando vengo a Madrid voy a verlo en la Puerta del Sol.

      Delete
  18. I am a mushroom lover, but unfortunately have no idea how to tell a tasty one from an undesirable one. So envious of your skills, Nadezda. And your images are divine.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not very knowledgeable, Carolyn, I pick only mushrooms I know. Thank you!

      Delete
  19. Replies
    1. Gracias, хороший уик-енд!

      Delete
  20. I always loved mushrooms even as a child. They are odd looking things and I guess that is why kids don't always like eating them. I bet they are delicious fresh from the forest.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're right, Jennifer, children usually don't like and don't eat mushrooms. I think because mushroom is hard food for stomach.Thank you!

      Delete
  21. Great post! I love mushrooms with meat, omelettes or soup. I don't pick them, though. Have you ever tried morel mushrooms? Don't know the Latin name, but they are highly prized here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jason, I know this mushroom: it's 'Morchella Esculenta', or 'Ptychoverpa boheminica', grows in the woods, parks, gardens. It's very similar to morel giant, very poisonous mushroom and many people never pick Morchella Esculenta because of difference is only the cap color.
      Thank you!

      Delete
  22. Stunning mushrooms! I love mushrooms and your meal looks tasty... Happy weekend, Nadezda!

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for stopping by Nadezda's Northern Garden blog!
I'm glad to read your friendly comments very much.
Feel free to comment on the posts or photos
I warmly welcome the new followers on my blog.