Thursday, May 29, 2014

Cineraria Maritime


I grow Cineraria Maritime as a border plant and in a flower bed. Usually I cultivate Cineraria maritime as an annual, decorative foliage plant, although it is a perennial. I like that it has beautiful, separate leaves covered with silvery felt at bottom, the plant has white - silver color that is clearly seen in full sunlight.

 
                              

Although Cineraria is beautiful Mediterranean plant, it grows well in my garden along with other annuals and perennials. I plant it in containers and vases with colorful petunias, blue and white lobelia .


Last year I decided to plant Cineraria next to white roses. I think it looks beautifully, shading white roses by silvery lacy leaves of Cineraria. 

 

I used to buy ready seedlings, 10 small sprouts in the cassette. This year I have grown Cineraria from seeds. During the first week it grows rapidly, soft fluffy leaves get their silvery color.

Do you grow Cineraria in your garden? Where do you plant it: in container  or in beds?

47 comments:

  1. I've grown this in the past and it does provide a foil to the more brightly coloured flowers.

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    1. Yes, it does, Sue. And is enough hardy, it's fine in cold weather. Thank you!

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  2. Cineraria is a lovely plant and makes a great contrast to your other plants. Lovely photos Nadezda, have a wonderful week.

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  3. Silver sword



    ALOHA from Honolulu
    ComfortSpiral
    =^..^=


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    1. Is it the name you call it? I love it!
      Thank you Cloudia!

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  4. That's beautiful plant. I've never had it in our garden. Happy Thursday, Nadezda!

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    1. This year I've grown cineraria from seeds, Satu. It germinates and grows well.
      Thank you!

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  5. First the white/greenish rose of last picture is so beautiful! I have grown Cineraria as an annual many times, it combines so beautiful in pots with all kinds of colours and different annuals. I never used it as a garden plant, but I use other grey coloured plants which are hardier in the border, like Artemisias.

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    1. I will try to grow on Artemisias as well Janneke. I've sown cineraria in March and now have nice silvery plants. I'm glad you liked the photo of white roses, this is 'Margaret Merrill' variety, hardy rose.
      Thank you!

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  6. Quite a beautiful plant Nadezda. I had never seen (to my knowledge) a Cineraria until this post.

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  7. Cineraria is a beautiful plant Nadezda,but i dont have it in my garden!
    Your roses are gorgeous!! Wishing you a happy Thursday!
    Dimi...

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    1. Cineraria is a plant of your area Dimi. Its motherland is Mediterranean, there it is perennial and in my garden it is annual.
      Thank you!

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  8. Se ve preciosa. La he visto en algunos camping adornando cuando vamos de vacaciones por Andalicía. No tengo jardín Nadezda, y este año tampoco huerto. Como se operó Paco hace mes y medio este año no sembramo, echaremos de menos los ricos tomates:(
    Buen día amiga.
    Un beso.

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    1. Espero que Paco se siente mejor dia al dia, Laura. Tus ricos tomates van a crecer en tu casa y tambien podras cosecharlos.
      Gracias!

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  9. I don't grow this plant but it is attractive. Here we call it dusty miller.

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    1. It's funny name ' dusty miller' Jason! It suits much to the plant!

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  10. It's beautiful with white roses and with lobelia too. I tried it once, but it grows rampantly here, and becomes huge and floppy. I think there are now dwarf strains, but I am not sure...

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    1. Ha, ha! It's small and soft here till fall. Once I tried grow it inside potting cineraria for winter. But it died in dry home air.
      Thank you, Masha!

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  11. I don't know this plant at all, but I will certainly be looking for it now. It looks really good against the roses. So unusual.

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    1. Tracey, this soft silvery plant suits to many other plants and shades they very well.
      Thank you!

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  12. Here in the U.S. we call it Dusty Miller; I have no idea how it got that name:) I use it in containers quite often, because it does provide a nice silvery contrast to colorful flowers, as you say. Best of all, it's so easy to care for. I've never tried planting it in the ground, but it does look good in your garden, Nadezda.

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    1. Thank you Rose, sure your plants look well!

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  13. That colour certainly stands out in your garden. It is a good contrast plant. You have a beautiful garden Nadezda and I can see that you spend a lot of time in preparation for the warmer season. I have a Cineraria Maritime which is looking very drab at the moment. I pruned it after summer, but I think it is time to take it out and start fresh again.
    Happy days Nadezda!

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    1. Yes, Betty I spend much time preparing my garden, cleaning, pruning, cutting...But I love this work!
      I tried to leave cineraria to winter in soil but it didn't survive. Now I sow it and grow on seedlings. Thank you!

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  14. Hi Nadezda
    Here we call it Dusty Miller and it is an extremely hardy annual, re-appearing each spring just like a perennial. It's quiet silver colour provides a great background to all the showy pinks and purples.

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    1. Hi, Astrid!
      Unfortunately cineraria does not re-appear here after snow melts :(( I need to sow it every spring or to buy seedlings in nursery. It looks very well with other plants, you're right!

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  15. I use to grow Cineraria too, I had 5 plants for many years and used to plant bedding plants in between them, different ones every year. In my garden they are evergreen so every spring I just had to cut them down to the first set of leaves and they would grow up again. When I redesigned my garden in 2011 I threw them out but I miss them, perhaps it is time to get some new. Thanks for reminding me, your photos are lovely and pay tribute to this beautiful and versatile plants.

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    1. You're welcome Helene! I throw them in autumn as well. I love its leaves and color.

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  16. What a beautiful plant ! It looks great in combination with other colors !
    Nadezda, I wish you a happy weekend :)

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    1. Thank you, Ela and happy new week!

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  17. I love silver foliage plants, they look great with roses! I don't grow cineraria but I have lavender, lambs' ears and "snow in summer" which is a ground cover with little white flowers.

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    1. It's true, Ruth all plants you mention are wonderful. I don't know what is 'snow in summer' but I think it's Cerastium, that I have variety Cerastium biebersteinii . I love it as well!

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  18. I love its silvery leaves. It makes such a wonderful filler foliage in the garden. Have a lovely week.

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  19. We have cinerarias here in NZ but they are a completely different plant, with pink or purple flowers. Yours have very attractive silver leaves, and must make a nice contrast to other foliage.

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    1. Yes they really do, Juliet. Thank you!

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  20. As a matter of fact, I added some cinerarias to my urns in the front garden earlier this evening. Like you I like the grey foliage and the lacy foliage. I also find it is a good choice for the urns which get baking hot and dry in full sun of the front garden.

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  21. Sorry I think something happened to my comment. I wrote that I too love this plant and have used it in the urns at the front of the house. I love the soft leaves and the grey color. I must say it looks terrific with your roses.

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    1. Jennifer, thank you for your comment! I plant cineraria in soil, not in container and I have no problem with cineraria at all.

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  22. I used to admire Cineraria when I travel during the winter period. They are generally seen in mixed container plantings. I'm glad to have learned its name from your post.

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  23. In my country cineraria is called the Old Man.
    Beautiful plant.
    Greetings.

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    1. Nice name is Old man! Thank you Lucja!

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  24. We have a flower called cineraria, but it's purple and magenta and looks quite different to this one. The white foliage is very striking.

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