Friday, September 12, 2014

Monarda in My Garden

This year I grew two varieties of Monarda. This is red Monarda didyma hybrid 'Fireball' and Monarda 'Pink Princes' that is light-purple and a quite high plant. These plants are rare in northern gardens, are not very popular. 





 Although it's a modest plant I think it deserves more popularity. Common love for spicy flavoring herbs and other aromatic plants increased the interest in Monarda, as the leaves are very fragrant and the taste of Monarda leaves adding in a tea pot is similar bergamot (Earls Grey tea). 



 
I've noticed that not only people love Monarda flowers and leaves but they also are helpful for garden inhabitants. This plant produces a lot of honey nectar. I've found out that its quite decorative faded heads with seeds are useful for birds in winter. Birds peck seeds and insects hidden among the withered flowers.



All photos were taken in August

What variety of Monarda is growing in your garden? Did you taste tea with Monarda leaves? Thank you!

P.S. I'm on holidays now, I will answer all your comments when I come back!

29 comments:

  1. Beautiful plants -- they really should be used more often. I love the bergamot scent, which is nice even if you just touch the leaves. Making tea from them is even better! You grow some pretty ones. I only have 'Petite Delight' which is very small with magenta flowers.

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    1. I'd like to have 'Petite Delight' too Laurrie. And plant it in my rockery garden!

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  2. Love that lila coloured variety of Monarda you're showing. Never saw it before. Most Monarda that I have seen are in more flashy colours like the bright red one, which I also love btw. I've tried Monarda in our garden years ago but it didn't survive. I think the soil isn't ideal and there isn't enough sun either. Maybe another plant I should try in a container ;) Only problem, I have absolutely no more room for more containers.
    Never tasted Monarda leaves.
    Have a great holiday time!
    Marian

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    1. Thank you Marian, I had very interesting holidays!

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  3. What a striking shape the Monarda is. It's not a plant I know. I enjoyed seeing it; thank you.

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  4. Wonderful pictures from your garden flowers dear Nadezda!!
    I don't know the Monarda plant!But its so preety!!
    Enjoy your holidays!Waiting to see many photos!
    Dimi...

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  5. Oh, those flowers are just gorgeous ! Nadezda, your garden is an amazing floral paradise. You have a lot of gorgeous original specimens of flowers !
    Have a nice weekend :)

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  6. Your two varieties are very attractive. I am surprised monada are not very popular in your area. Here you seem them often, perhaps because it is a North-American plant.

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    1. Yes, it is Alain. I think monarda needs very special soil here and soft winter with snow to cover it. I always cover monarda for wintering.
      Thank you!

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  7. This is a native plant for me and it was named here by local Native tribes....known as Oswego Tea. It is very important to the habitat of my garden as the pollinators, butterflies and hummingbirds love this plant all season. I am glad you have planted it. You have 2 lovely species here...the red is Monarda didyma and the light purple is monarda bergamot which is perfect for tea too. I adore the smell of this plant. So wonderful to see it in your garden. Hope you had a lovely holiday!

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    1. I love tea with monarda leaves too Donna. I put the leaves of both varieties, lovely taste!
      Thank you Donna!

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  8. I've just bought Gardenview Scarlet

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    1. Hope this monarda will grow well in you allotment Sue!

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    2. It's going to be planted in the garden Nadazda

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  9. I have never grown monarda before. They look so beautiful. How interesting if the leaves could be giving taste on tea. I think they coul be grown from cutting.

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    1. I've never grown monarda from cuttings, Endah, only from seed. But I should try:))

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  10. I think I hove those both as well in our garden. They bloom beautifully for a long time. Happy holidays, Nadezda!

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  11. It's so nice in your garden, Nadieżda! So usually :-)))

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    1. Thank you ewarub, glad you stopped by!

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  12. Será modesta pero es preciosa. Variados colores nos dejas hoy.
    Un beso.

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  13. I have two different kinds of Monarda growing in my garden, but I'm not sure what type either of them are. I wish I had a red one--yours is lovely! The best part about Monarda is that it attracts so many pollinators; when I was in Oregon, the hummingbirds were going crazy over it. I just saw that you were in London and visited Helene--how wonderful! It's always fun to meet other bloggers; I've found that gardeners never have a shortage of things to talk about:)

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    1. You're right Rose, we gardeners "never have a shortage of things to talk about". I spent nice time with Helene enjoying her garden and her cat.
      Thank you!

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  14. I have a lot of monarda. I'm surprised it's not more popular in your area. I love its fragrance and ability to attract pollinators and hummingbirds. I have 'Jacob Kline' , 'Raspberry Wine', 'Claire Grace', 'Peter's Purple', 'Coral Reef', and a few others. Your monarda is beautiful!

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    1. So many varieties of monarda you have Tammy! Wow! I have to read about and buy some more. Thank you!

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