Sunday, September 13, 2020

The Old Railway Station

I would like to suggest you travel virtually with me, since real travel is not yet available. Today I want to tell you about the old railway station, which is located not far from the St. Petersburg downtown, on the way to my summer cottage.
Pargolovo railway station is located next to the village of the same name. Not far from the village, there is a cemetery and a large agricultural farm.
People arrive to Pargolovo station to visit the graves of their relatives, especially on Trinity Day, as this is an Orthodox tradition. There are large fields of cabbage and carrot that belong to the agricultural farm 'Pargolovo'.

 


I have memories associated with this station. For many years I have been interested in the old station building which is very similar to an old Scandinavian castle. One day I went inside and saw a beautiful waiting room, a wood paneled ceiling, amazing furnaces to heat this waiting room and a nice tiled floor.

The history of the construction of the railway station near the Pargolovo village began in the 1906. This railway has connected St. Petersburg with Helsinki, the capital of Finland.

 


The author of the station was Granholm Bruno (1857-1930) a Finnish architect. Graduated from the Polytechnic Institute in Helsinki, he held the position of Architect of the Main Directorate of Railways in Finland. Granholm Bruno completed plans and sketches for the station, hall and furnaces.


The furnaces at Pargolovo station have features of the Art Nouveau style these are inserts and ornamental patterns with a curly wavy line motif. The furnaces are faced with emerald green tiles with unusual floral designs. There were the use of various materials (ceramics, colored glazes, metal), in a combination of certain colors. The furnaces were made at the 'Abo' factory and are of undoubted artistic value.


Waiting room tiled floor

  
Wood paneled ceiling
 
Emerald green tile furnaces
 

Is there a train station near your place? How often do you travel by train?

 

19 comments:

  1. Hi Nadezda,

    It's wonderful to see the old railway station. It's a beautiful building. Here where I live there is no railway at all. I need to drive by my car. It's a long time since I traveled with train. It's sad because I really love to travel by train.

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    1. You're right, Marit, the railways are no longer used as they used to be. This station is well maintained due to its artistic value.

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  2. This has been a fascinating tour, Nadezda, and what a grand old building it is. We do have a train station here, but I have never been in it, and in recent years it has been modernized, so I suspect that any original charm it might have had has been lost. I think they call that progress! Other than for commuter traffic train travel in Canada is nowhere near what it formerly was,

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    1. David, this is a commuter train station, the schedule is not as frequent as I would like. The Pargolovo station building is amazing, I agree.

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  3. Me ha encantado verla Nadezda. Se añora el tren.
    En Béjar el ferrocarril dejó de pasar en 1984. La estación estuvo muchos años abandonada peleamos mucho para que la rehabilitaran y lo conseguimos. El edificio es un alberge y el trayecto que el tren recorría es una gran vía verde que le ha dado vida a la antigua estación. Siempre me ha gustado viajaer en tren.
    Buen semana amiga. Cuídate.
    Un abrazo.

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    1. Laura, recuerdo muy bien tu publicación sobre esta estación, que la gente luchó para rehabilitarla. Y ahora hay una ruta de turismo.
      ¡Buen miercoles!

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  4. I loved this virtual tour Nadezda and enjoyed learning about the architecture and history behind this old station. Thank you for sharing this.

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    1. Yes, they are Anne. Glad you liked this building interior.

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  6. I liked visiting to your station, Nadezda. I love traveling by train.
    Have a nice new week!
    Hugs!

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    1. So do I Tania but these travels are not frequent :-(
      All the best!

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  7. What an interesting station! I wonder how many trains stop there these days. It is good to see that the tiled floor is such good condition, and it is all clean and well cared for, and also that they have kept the picturesque old stoves. Here in Britain in the 1960s many of our more beautiful old stations were "modernized" to fit in with the corporate image of the state owned railway company. Those which remain have been carefully preserved now that fashions have changed, but it is sad to see how many beautiful old buildings have gone.

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    1. You're right Jenny, some old buildings were modernized here too, fortunately only inside but the facades have been preserved. This railway station was lucky, I think it was far away from 'modernizers'.
      Nowadays I suppose commuter trains stop there very rarely on weekdays.

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  8. Such a beautiful building! When I have seen the first photo, I thought that it looks like a castle... :)
    What you told about its history is very interesting.
    When I was younger, I enjoyed very much travelling by train and often met interesting people onboard.
    Stay safe and well!

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    1. PS Your header photo collage is beautiful!

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    2. I do liked traveling by train as well Sara but it was many many years ago. This station reminds me some moments of my life, happy and sad.

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  9. Muy bonita la estación, me encanta viajar en tren me trae muy bonitos recuerdos. Besos.

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    1. Me encanta que disfrutes viajando en tren, Teresa. Y me gustaba viajar en tren, pero no lo he usado durante mucho tiempo.

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