Monday, August 6, 2018

Cineraria maritima

Cineraria Maritima (common name Silver Dust Plant or Dusty Miller) is one of my favorite ornamental garden plants. I love it for its attractive silvery-white leaves, which add variety to the garden. I think Cineraria is ideal for beds, borders, rockeries and even containers.


There was a plant of Cineraria that grew and bloomed from May to September in my garden, then overwintered on my windowsill in the city and the next spring was moved back to the garden. In April I sowed Cineraria seeds, planted seedlings in May in the border where young Cinerarias are growing.



In July I decided to conduct an experiment with Cineraria cuttings. So I made a soil mixture: garden soil + sand + ash. I've prepared 6 small pots for cuttings, filled in the soil mixture and planted the cuttings.




Thus, a tray with pots of Cineraria cuttings was placed on a shelf in the greenhouse. They were growing in the company of rose cuttings, dill, coriander and cucumbers.




Two weeks passed and 4 young Ceneraria cuttings are well, healthy, rooted, and new leaves sprout. I'm sure they will be OK in the garden.


This was my first experience in growth new plants of Cineraria. Did you conduct the similar experiment with Cineraria or with other plants? 



 

47 comments:

  1. Congratulations on your enterprising spirit and the fine results. I have never done anything like this, but I am not a gardener. I will have to ask my wife if she has tried it.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Cineraria is such a nice silver color and I love the lacy leaves. They look good with just about any other plants or flowers. How wonderful that your experiment was a success!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Agree, Peter. It suits pretty with many plants.

      Delete
  3. Good morning Nadezda,
    Great that your gardenplants experiment is such a succes. I love the silver color.
    Have a wonderful day
    Rosehugs Marijke

    ReplyDelete
  4. Надежда,интересное растение,красивый цвет,хорошо контрастирует с зеленью сада...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. И достаточно популярное Надежда, особенно на клумбах в городе, потому что хорошо оттеняет другие цветы.

      Delete
  5. Good work! Now you have many plants for free. This way you can make a whole flower bed with them. Lovely. Groetjes Hetty

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I could Hetty. But autumn is coming and I must transfer Cineraria to the city home.

      Delete
  6. Hola Nadezda, aunque conozco muy bien esta planta, me resultó muy curioso saber ver como las multiplicas, yo siempre las conseguí a través de semillas. Muchas gracias. Besos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, cembrar de semillas y esperar que creceria o no, esto ya no me gusta, Lola. Voy a multiplicarlo ahora de esta manera.

      Delete
  7. Que bien Nadezda, yo suelo hacer experimentos parecidos. Buena semana.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I agree, this is a very attractive plant, and you are very clever to get it to root. Economical and satisfying.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it is catmint. To have for free many plants.

      Delete
  9. Hi Nadezda! Beautifully colored plant! Have you got a lot of cucumbers?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anne, I have large amount of cucumbers I have ever had. I think my new greenhouse is very hot or it's the weather :-)

      Delete
  10. Hello Nadezda,

    So nice that you have produced your own plants of cineraria. They are veey pretty with the grey leaves.
    Happy new week!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Oh, your Cineraria are beautiful!
    I take cuttings from many garden plants, Rosa, Cornus, Ribes, Vitis... but I usually plant them in the ground, in a small area jokingly called "the nursery". This summer has been challenging (so little rain), but usually they manage rather well.
    Happy August, Nadezda!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're professional gardener, Sara having your own nursery. I should do the same. So next spring :-) I'd love to have rose cutting to propagate my favorite varieties.

      Delete
  12. Hi Nadezda!
    It's a good idea to make cuttings for plants, I do it too.
    Happy week!

    ReplyDelete
  13. This plant I would call 'Dusty Miller'. It is widely available here in the spring so I have never tried to propagate it. I do like the way you can plant it by a flower that you want to highlight. The silver/grey leaves are like a beacon in the garden and draws peoples eye. I am glad you were successful with your propagation. I am basically a lazy gardener. I have rarely propagated any plants. I have had coleus sprout roots when I have put them in a vase. I guess that is an accidental propagation! Happy planting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've never propagated coleus because it's too tender for our climate, Lisa. Once impatiens got rooted in a vase as well. Cineraria with its leaves really looks like 'Dusty miller'!

      Delete
  14. What a fun experiment. We've propagated many things for.our garden, but never 'dusty miller'. Glad it worked for you.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Lovely, this plant is in my plant list to be grown in our tiny garden

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It deserves to be in your garden Endah.

      Delete
  16. Taking cuttings and growing new plants from them is a lot of fun. I grow new lavender and salvias from cuttings.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lavender? I should try, Tistou, thanks for idea!

      Delete
  17. Hello Nadezda : )
    I love silvery plants in the garden .. I have a border of Lamb's Ears and Valerie Finnis artimisia .
    You were very successful with growing these new plants, well done ! They do provide a pretty contrast to other garden plants indeed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Agree, Joy. I love its leaves as well, the flowers are poor.

      Delete
  18. When we were in Aberdeen our front garden was never without Cineraria. We were into bedding display in a big way in those days, Cineraria toned it down. I am impressed with your gardening skills.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, Alistair thanks for your words, Cineraria goes well to many plants.

      Delete
  19. Very interesting! Here we also call this plant "Dusty Miller".

    ReplyDelete
  20. You did a great job! I like the silver leaves of Cineraria. I used to make a wreath using dried Cineraria leaves. Thank you for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're welcome, Keity! I love your idea to make a wreath of dried Cineraria leaves. Great, I'll have many dried leaves in September and will store them for wreath.

      Delete
  21. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for stopping by Nadezda's Northern Garden blog!
I'm glad to read your friendly comments very much.
Feel free to comment on the posts or photos
I warmly welcome the new followers on my blog.